Northern Rockies Regional Municipality

Invasive Plants

The Northern Rockies strives to keep communities and roads looking beautiful, but there are a few non-native plant species that have found themselves in the area. Invasive plants pose a threat to native species by competing for space and eventually taking over physical areas. 

If you are disposing any invasive plants at the Northern Rockies Landfill, please bag all materials in plastic bags to prevent the spread of seeds. 

Invasive Plants in the Northern Rockies:

Oxeye Daisy 

Oxeye Daisy is a daisy flower with white petals and a yellow center. Some view it to be a pretty flower, but if encouraged, it will take over and supress native plants. They can grow to be 2.5 ft. tall with leaves ranging from 4-15cm long.

If you come across oxeye daisy plants, hand pulling is an effective treatment. Make sure that plants are pulled from the root to prevent regrowth. Mowing can be an effective treatment, but should be repeated often. 

Scentless Camomile 

Scentless Chamomile looks similar to the Oxeye Daisy. It has a daisy like flower with a yellow center and can grow up to 1 meter tall. Leaves are fern like and are scentless when crushed or broken. Scentless chamomile will have multiple flowers growing from one stem. 

If you come across scentless chamomile plants, hand pulling is the most effective treatment. Make sure that plants are pulled from the root to prevent regrowth. Mowing is NOT an effective treatment method. 

Sow Thistle

Sow Thistle have multiple dandelion-like flower heads. They can grow to be 1.5 meters tall and will produce a milk like liquid when cut. 

If you come across sow thistle plants, hand pulling is an effective treatment. Make sure plants are pulled from the root to prevent regrowth. Mowing is an effective treatment, but should be repeated often. 

Wild Caraway

Wild Caraway has several stems attached to each plant with a small cluster of white or soft pink flowers at the end. Leaves are similar to carrot tops, ranging the entire length of the stem. 

This plant has a two year life cycle, the first year growth is a rosette of leaves and the second year of growth produces a tall flowering stalk. Treatment is most effective in the first year, either by hand pulling or with use of herbicide. Mowing is NOT an effective treatment method. 

 

 

More information on these and other invasive plants can be found on the Northern Rockies Invasive Plant Committee website:

www.nripc.com

Meta Navigation

Home | Latest News | Contact Us | Sitemap

December 17 not-available 15°C